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FLOODING

The island floods, but all the houses are built on stilts which keeps them above the flood water.  (so far ) 20/2/2014


FLOODING: OFFICIAL REPORTSThe Pavilion. copyright Daniel Rogers

Flood line information for Molesey lock to Teddington Lock
Instructions:
Tel: 0845 988 1188 then 0111274
or select option 1 for general flooding
information.
Online: www.environment-agency.gov.uk




What is flooding?

Flooding takes place on a small scale regularly, when the river can come up over the moorings on the high tide on the full moon. (with a dog howling in the background.)

Floods of Oct 1999.The Bridge, floods 2003. copyright Andy Specter

The mainstream, floods 2003. copyright Andy Spector

These were preceded by enormous storms, it rained for days, the river Mole ran bright red, logs and trees, were carried past the Island eventually smashing into Lots Road power station and wiping out the Tube systems for the day. These storms flooded the M25 by Leatherhead, the majority of the rain being in the Mole valley area, not so much in the Thames Valley. This resulted in the highest flood levels of modern times, to walk along the path you needed Chest waders.

Floods of January 2000.

These were really a continuation of the floods of the previous October, this was a very, very, wet winter. The water levels here were continually high, causing the greatest cost to some islanders in eroding their properties and these floods were the start of Goose Flat as it has now become known the area of land between the Island (No.1) and Swan Island, caused by deposition of silt.

To walk along the path you needed waders.

Floods of January 2003.

To go out on New Years Eve you needed waders, by the 2nd of January all hell let loose! It had rained a lot for several days, To get along the path you needed waders and all islanders were keeping an eye on the weather and the river levels.

The helicopter started the days excitement, apparently someone had reported an upside down canoe in the river, The police in their Helicopter arrived first, sweeping up and down the river looking for the lost canoeist? As the light faded the Fire Brigade rescue boat had arrived , they went up and down the river rather gingerly. Then the Life Boats from Teddington arrived, they had found the canoe, it had an inflatable boat stuffed inside it, so no one could have been in it, they assumed it had floated of from someone's garden. By this time the Swan car park, had a police incident room, there were reporters from all the major TV companies, the Circus had come to the Island. The water level at this time was not as high as in October 1999.The Path, looking upsteam 2003. copyright Andy Specter

But we were told that there was a surge of water coming of several feet. Islanders went into immediate action, Furniture was moved. elderly helped , pets stoked and reassured, the police with the life boat persons asked us all to leave. Some did, some stayed, some never went home that night, the only thing that did not happen was the surge in water. It stayed the same. By 21.00 hrs that night we had heard that Chertsey had flooded but the surge never occurred!

The Path, looking downstream. copyright Andy Specter

The pub that night had a carnival atmosphere, the Island had survived! For the people on the mainland not so good, the sewers had backed up putting raw sewage into basements and houses. As I returned over the bridge that night the Life Boats which were moored on the garden furniture we being stood down.

The Island featured heavily on the news that night, local residents were on Sky news every fifteen minutes, the papers the next day told tales of Floating Gin Palaces banging against patio doors. The real stories in Chertsey were missed completely. Never trust the press.

Report from the Scotsman newspaper. (never trust the Scots)3rd Jan 2003

Experts hope worst of flooding is over

JAMES REYNOLDS ENVIRONMENT CORRESPONDENT

DESPITE incessant rain sweeping much of England yesterday, hopes were high that hundreds of homes had escaped yet more flooding following the deluge.

Homeowners were warned of a "critical" point earlier in the day when more rainfall could have wreaked havoc on sodden ground and swollen rivers.

The Environment Agency was hoping that the worst case scenario had been avoided, though it emphasised that "we are not 100 per cent out of the woods".

Ray Kemp, a spokesman for the agency, said water still had to "percolate through the hills" and fears remained that the downpour would cause more problems, particularly in Lewes, in East Sussex, and Yalding in Kent.

Almost 150 people were marooned on an island on the Thames after it became swamped by floodwater. A hazardous operation involving three RNLI rescue boats was underway to ship stranded residents to the safety of the mainland.

The drama began at nightfall on Thames Ditton Island in Surrey, about a mile west of Kingston Bridge.

The island is one of the most expensive addresses in Surrey and the 46 homes carry an average price tag of £500,000.

In the same stretch of the Thames, a canoeist was reported missing and extensive searches were being carried out.

Forecasters predicted drier weather would emerge by the weekend and through the early part of next week.

Flood damage to west end of Island 2003. copyright A. Specter

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OFFICIAL REPORTS

Author: Director of Planning & Environmental Services

Portfolio Holder: Cllr. Gordon Chubb

Business Plan ref: F1

Exempt information: None

Delegated status: For Information

PURPOSE: To advise Members of the involvement of the Council in assisting with dealing with the New Year flooding.

REPORT:

1. As Members will of course be aware, significant flooding occurred in the Borough over the New Year. Initial problems occurred on Monday, 30 December 2002 when the heavy rainfall, coupled with the high water table, resulted in localised flooding in the Hare Lane area of Claygate. In addition to ensuring that the grilles on the River Rythe remained clear of debris, in consultation with local Ward Councillors, officers arranged for 45 sandbags to be distributed to 3 category "A" risk properties in the locality. Members may recall from previous reports that, following the widespread flooding that occurred in 2000, a comprehensive database of properties known to be liable to flood has been prepared which categorises those properties according to the degree of risk - "A" being the highest risk.

2. There is no two.

3. On Tuesday, 31 December 2002, following liaison with the Environment Agency and other parties, it became clear that a significant risk of flooding from the Thames was possible over the New Year period. Whilst also much higher than usual, the Rivers Mole and Wey were not considered at that time to present so much of a problem but nevertheless needed to be monitored. Given the difficulties of dealing with sandbag distribution and other relief duties over the Bank Holiday period, the decision was taken to activate relevant sections of the Corporate and Directorate Emergency Plans and to distribute sandbags and advisory leaflets to all category "A" risk properties on the Rivers Wey, Thames and Rythe. A total of 1295 sandbags were distributed during Tuesday, 31 December to 83 such properties. Officers continued to liaise with the Environment Agency and Surrey County Council Emergency Control Centre staff and to monitor the state of the rivers and watercourses in the Borough over the Bank Holiday. 50 sandbags were delivered to properties in Blundel Lane, Cobham over the New Year to assist with a localised problem.

4. ttddi because of anticipated further rise in the level of the Thames. This information was passed to Surrey County Council Emergency Control and to the Surrey Police who assumed responsibility for the recommended evacuation. A warning was also given to Seeboard. In accordance with agreed emergency procedures, the Community Support Services Division were alerted to the evacuation of Thames Ditton Island and the Claygate Day Centre was made available as a rest centre to evacuees from 2 p.m. on 2 January. In the event, two households - one from Wheatleys Eyot and the other from Thames Ditton Island - sought assistance from the Council that day and were located in B&B/hotel accommodation. A total of 200 sandbags were issued to a number of Category "B" risk properties along the Thames, together with further bulk supplies of sandbags for Thames Ditton Island and Beasleys Ait.

5. Further monitoring of the position continued on Friday, 3 January. An additional household from Wheatleys Eyot sought the Council’s assistance and were placed in accommodation in Cobham for two nights.

6. Whilst the position on the Thames remained of concern for several more days the flood levels stabilised and then starting subsiding, with the Environment Agency able to reduce progressively the level of flood warnings issued for rivers in the Borough.

7. During the period, officers endeavoured to keep appropriate Members up-to-date with the emerging position and the action being taken. Assistance and advice was also given to residents on-site and over the telephone.

8. The Council’s Corporate and Directorate Emergency Plans, which had been revised and amended in the light of experience gained in the 2000 floods, generally worked well albeit that the timing of the flooding over the New Year period added several complications. As with the 2000 floods, a review will be undertaken and any necessary further adjustments to emergency procedures put in place.

9. In addition to the riparian flooding outlined in this report, significant surcharging of the foul sewerage system again occurred in parts of the Borough and caused extensive flooding. In Claygate, especially in the Hare Lane Green area, flooding of roads, the Green and around properties occurred from Monday, 30 December through to Wednesday, 1 January. Also on 1 January in the area of Thames Ditton High Street, the same problem seriously affected properties and businesses. As Members will be aware, this infrastructure is the responsibility of Thames Water. Deficiencies in the infrastructure in these, and other, parts of the Borough have previously been drawn to the company’s attention. Thames Water’s response to this flooding and a review of its response to earlier concerns expressed to it, will be reported in due course to the Environmental Affairs Overview & Scrutiny Committee.

Financial implications: to be established

Environmental implications: Exempt- admin.issues

Legal implications: None

Background papers: None

Enclosures/Appendices: None

Contact name /telephone number:

D.R. Wiltshire 01372 474700

Email Address:

dwiltshire@elmbridge.gov.uk
____________________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________

The incursion by the river on 7th March 2007

Early morning on the 7th

click thumbnail to enlarge

These are picture of Molesey Weir and Teddington Weir at about high tide on the 7th


Molesey weir 15.45 hrs 7/3/07

Molesey weir,

note that the water is only about one foot lower on the kingston side.


Teddington weir at 16.45 hrs 7/03/07

Note no diference in water levels

Wierdly it looks like the gates are shut..

This at high tide with kingston flooding!






Home

Experts hope worst of flooding is over

JAMES REYNOLDS ENVIRONMENT CORRESPONDENT

DESPITE incessant rain sweeping much of England yesterday, hopes were high that hundreds of homes had escaped yet more flooding following the deluge.

Homeowners were warned of a "critical" point earlier in the day when more rainfall could have wreaked havoc on sodden ground and swollen rivers.

The Environment Agency was hoping that the worst case scenario had been avoided, though it emphasised that "we are not 100 per cent out of the woods".

Ray Kemp, a spokesman for the agency, said water still had to "percolate through the hills" and fears remained that the downpour would cause more problems, particularly in Lewes, in East Sussex, and Yalding in Kent.

Almost 150 people were marooned on an island on the Thames after it became swamped by floodwater. A hazardous operation involving three RNLI rescue boats was underway to ship stranded residents to the safety of the mainland.

The drama began at nightfall on Thames Ditton Island in Surrey, about a mile west of Kingston Bridge.

The island is one of the most expensive addresses in Surrey and the 46 homes carry an average price tag of £500,000.

In the same stretch of the Thames, a canoeist was reported missing and extensive searches were being carried out.

Forecasters predicted drier weather would emerge by the weekend and through the early part of next week.

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